Gross Volume 101

The industry standard in partial shipment billing  is based on the gross volume – the outside measurements (length x width x height) of a pallet or crate.

The gross volume is always more then the sum of it’s parts because 1) the pallet that the items are stacked on takes up space and 2) most often the stacked boxes do not form a complete cube.

Consider the two LEGO shipments below.

Imagine the pallet on the left is 48″ x 40″ and the boxes are stacked 48″ high – that would make the gross volume to be about 54 cubic feet or 1.54 cubic meters.

If you add just ONE book box (which is only 1.5 cubic feet) to the top of the stack, then the whole gross volume increases to 66 cubic feet or 1.88 cubic meters.

The amount of “wasted space” from the pallet and the unused space at the top amounts to 27% — that’s a considerable amount of space to be paying for but not actually using.   (The pallet itself is only 6 inches tall but it’s about 7 cubic feet.)

From surveying websites, it seems the accepted “wasted space” with regular household goods is 10% to 20% of the packed volume.   That means a stacked/palletized 300 cubic foot shipment would have a gross volume of 330 to 360 cubic feet.

 

A Great Example.

Often young people want to ship their bed and a dozen boxes.  When calculating the volume of each item it might come out to 100 cubic feet, but from the way it gets stacked on the pallet the gross volume could be much, much more.

Why?

Because the bed is long and the gross volume is based on the outside measurements.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us at AliyahLift@gmail.com.

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