Unlocking the Mysteries of Volume

Recognize these iconic chairs? What's the volume? Answer at the bottom.

Recognize these iconic chairs? What’s the volume? Answers at the bottom.

 

Volume is the biggest cost factor in international shipping.  It also happens to be one of the hardest concepts for people to understand.

 

Due to it’s complex nature, we’ve spent considerable effort explaining it in a variety of ways.

Spreadsheet.  Initially, we would sent out an Aliyah Lift Volume Estimator spreadsheet filled with the volumes of common items throughout a home.   Customers could plug in the quantity and get an approximate volume.   (I think we will revamp this and offer it again.   Additionally, I looked at apps on the market and/or developing an app specifically for Aliyah Lift Shipping.  Perhaps we will put that together in the near future.)

Video.  A couple years later we produced two videos ( Volume Video 1 & Volume Video 2) showcasing 10 household items per video and their volume, set to some fun lounge music.  It’s a passive learning experience and a good way to get the basics of how big things in the home are.  (Based on the views it seems these tools are underutilized.  Maybe two minutes is too long to spend….)

Hybrid – Lists, Picture and Dimensions.  Here at our 200 Cubic Feet – Minimum Shipment webpage we approach the concept with different approaches – including the absurd, because maybe that will help somebody too!

Visual.  Just the other day, in our home office. we were discussing creative ways to explain volume and the idea occurred to me – pictures of rooms loaded with furniture and the volume of each item clearly labeled.  It seemed so obvious but yet, I had not seen it before!

Home Survey.  Ultimately, a home survey with our highly-skilled surveyors is the best way to get an approximate total volume.  Since we value our agents time, we prefer to set up surveys once we have a good feeling we will be handling the move.

 

So, without further delay, we present our latest webpage > VOLUME CENTRAL

(The volumes are approximate and may not reflect what’s in your home but it should help.)

 

And now for the answers….

Bunkers

Archie & Edith’s chairs were once on display at the Smithsonian museum.

Archie’s chair is about 25 cubic feet, Edith’s chair is about 15 cubic feet and the table between them is about 5 cubic feet.

 

 

 

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